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Tooth Tourism Blog

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Your Oral Health

Keeping your teeth, gums, jawbone, and the supporting tissues clean are very important in maintaining good oral health. By brushing, flossing, and also brushing/scraping your tongue can prevent mouth problems and diseases. When you stop taking care of your teeth, you will not only get cavities, stained teeth, toothaches, and crooked teeth, your mouth will be at risk of diseases such as gum diseases, diabetes, HIV, cancer, and even eating disorders.

Below, Whoopi Goldberg tells us about her oral health. She explains the importance of good oral health and prevent periodontal disease!

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Friday, December 19, 2008

Bad Breath and Halitosis

Bad Breath (halitosis) is a major issue for a lot of people as it can result in embarrassment or even shame in certain situations. Unfortunately, many people are not even aware that they have a problem. Bad breath is typically related to oral hygiene habits or a sign of other health issues.

Bad breath is ranked as the third most common reason for people to seek denial aid net to tooth decay and periodontal disease. In some cases where people have chronic bad breath, it can be a more serious issue. Chronic bad breath affects almost a quarter of the population in varying degrees. Persistent bad breath can affect an individual's business, personal, and social relationships which can lead to self-esteem issues and increased stress.

How Can I Prevent Bad Breath?

  • - You must visit your dentist at least every six months for checkups to keep your mouth free of plaque buildup and other problems that may lead to bad breath.

  • - Maintain your diet and watch/avoid your consumption of foods such as alcohol, coffee, dense proteins, garlic and onions, and sugars.

  • - Try to breathe through your nose. Breathing through your mouth can lead to having a dry mouth, which creates a breeding ground for odor-causing bacteria.

  • - Brush your teeth and tongue twice a day to remove food particles and plaque, and floss between teeth once a day, preferably in the evening after you eat.

  • - Use a fluoride mouth rinse; it will help to protect your teeth and the flavor will mask odor.
Need to find a dentist? Let ToothTourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)

Contact http://www.toothtourism.com/ today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

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Thursday, December 18, 2008

Should I brush or floss first?

Definitely floss, then brush

It is better to floss and then brush because when you floss, plaque falls onto your teeth. As a result, when you start brushing you will be able to get all plaque off.

You need to floss at least once a day. If you can floss twice a day, you will have really good oral hygiene (the basic recommendation is to floss once a day and brush twice a day).

Brushing your teeth will not clean between your teeth, cleaning every day will prevent bacteria from colonizing or else it will start damaging your teeth within 24 hours. Also clean your mouth after flossing to spit out the bacteria and food particles. Flossing helps fight gingivitis and periodontal diseases, which are the main causes of tooth loss.

Tips to remember

  • 1) Establish a regular routine and time for flossing so you don't forget
  • 2) Brushing only cleans 60 percent of your teeth; so don't forget to floss first.
  • 3) Flossing helps to remove plaque from in between your teeth.
  • 4) Brushing alone only cleans three fourths of your teeth's surfaces, so if you brush and don't floss it is like not cleaning seven of your teeth!
  • 5) Flossing cleans the areas your toothbrush can not reach which is the tooth surfaces between your teeth.

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

Why Do I Grind My Teeth At Night? (Bruxism)

Bruxism is the medical term for the grinding of teeth; it is a reflexive action rather than a learned habit. Bruxism stems from the natural chewing activity that is controlled by reflex nerve pathways which are activated during sleep. Chewing depends on higher control functions from the brain and when a person is asleep, those control functions are deactivated which can result in bruxism.

What Are the Causes of Bruxism?

While the exact causes of bruxism are still relatively unknown, researchers believe that there are significant factors involved. Some factors include, being overly stressed, sleeping problems, an abnormal bite, and crooked or missing teeth. In some cases children may grind their teeth due to a misalignment of their top and bottom teeth.

In adults, mental factors seem to be associated with Bruxism, including:
  • anxiety, stress or tension
  • suppressed anger or frustration
  • aggressive, competitive or hyperactive personality type

What Are the Symptoms of Bruxism?

  • abraded teeth
  • facial pain
  • oversensitive teeth
  • tense facial and jaw muscles
  • headaches, dislocation of the jaw
  • a popping or clicking in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)
  • tongue indentations
  • damage to the inside of the cheek
  • teeth that are worn down, flattened or chipped
  • worn tooth enamel, exposing the inside of your tooth
  • increased tooth sensitivity
  • jaw pain or tightness in your jaw muscles

How Do I Prevent Bruxism?

If you find that your teeth grinding is related to stress, try to find ways to help yourself relax. Also, one can reduce consumption of stimulants such as caffeine or tobacco to reduce bruxism. Lastly, teeth grinding can be prevented by wearing a bite plate or a bite splint at night.

Can My Bruxism Be Treated?

The treatment of Bruxism depends on the following factors
  • Your age, overall health, and medical history
  • Extent of the disease
  • Your tolerance for specific medications, procedures, or therapies

How Do I Treat Bruxism?

Behavior modification
Training the patient how to rest his/her tongue, teeth, and lips properly, and learning how to rest the tongue upward may relieve uneasiness on the jaw while keeping the teeth apart and lips closed.

Mouthpiece
A specially-fitted plastic mouth appliance may be worn at night to absorb the force of biting. This piece of equipment may help to prevent future damage to the teeth and help in changing the patient's behavior.

Biofeedback
Biofeedback involves an electronic instrument that measures the amount of muscle activity of the mouth and jaw. This is especially helpful for daytime bruxers.

Need to find a dentist? Let ToothTourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)

Contact http://www.toothtourism.com/ today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

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Monday, December 15, 2008

Dental Cavities

Dental Cavities is the destruction of the tooth structure (tooth decay), a disease known as Caries. Cavities form when your teeth is often exposed to starchy and sugary foods such as soda pop, candy, ice cream, milk, cakes, fruits, vegetables, and juices (foods containing carbohydrates). Bacteria in the mouth digest the deposits from these foods and turn them into acids. The bacteria, acid, food debris, and saliva combined forms plaque, which clings on to the teeth. The acids in plaque dissolve the enamel surface of the teeth, creating holes or indents in the teeth called cavities, or caries.

Whom do dental cavities affect?

Dental cavities affect everyone, especially children and young adults. Whenever gum tissue is pulled from the teeth, chances for gum disease increases, exposing tooth roots to plaque. Pregnant women craving sweet foods make them more susceptible to developing cavities.

In older adults, decay is formed around the edges of fillings because many older adults lacked the benefits of fluoride and modern preventive dental care. Over time, fillings may weaken and can fracture, allowing bacteria to build up in the tiny gap causing tooth decay.

How Do I Know if I Have a Cavity?

In advanced stages of tooth decay, you may experience toothache (especially after consuming sweet, hot, or cold foods or drinks). Visible pits or holes in the teeth are results of tooth decay.

Treatment

-If decay is not wide, the decayed portion of the tooth is removed by drilling and a filling made of silver alloy, gold, porcelain, or a composite resin is used to fill the open space.

-If the decay is extensive with limited tooth structure remaining, crowns are used after the repairs are made, fitting over the remainder of the tooth. Crowns are made from gold, porcelain, or porcelain fused to metal.

Prevention

-Oral hygiene is very important to prevent cavities. Regular cleaning in every 6 months, brushing at least twice a day, and flossing at least daily will result in good oral hygiene.

-Chewy, sticky foods are best if eaten as part of a meal rather than as a snack. Brush the teeth or rinse the mouth after eating these foods.

-Avoid constant sipping of sugary drinks or frequent sucking on candy and mints.

-Dental sealants can prevent cavities. Sealants are thin plastic-like coating applied to the chewing surfaces of the molars. This coating prevents the accumulation of plaque in the deep grooves on these vulnerable surfaces.

-Fluoride toothpaste or mouthwashes also protect the surface of the teeth.

How can I protect my teeth from cavaties?

You can protect your teeth from cavities by cutting down on sweets and between-meal snacks because these starchy and sugary foods put your teeth at extra risk. Also, brushing after each meal, flossing daily, and regular dental check ups is the best way to fight cavities.

Need to find a dentist? Let ToothTourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)

Contact http://www.toothtourism.com/ today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

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Friday, December 12, 2008

What is Tooth Erosion and How Can I Avoid It?

Tooth Erosion is the wearing away of tooth enamel by acid. It is caused by consuming acidic foods and drinks which allows the acid to dissolve away the surface of the tooth. Prolonged exposure to acid over a long period of time will result in a loss enamel. This loss of enamel will eventually cause the tooth to 'shrink' as it crumbles around the biting edge.

Tooth erosion can lead to a multitude of mild dental problems such as tooth discoloration or sensitive teeth as well as severe dental complications such as severe tooth tooth sensitivity or cracked teeth.

What Are the Symptoms of Tooth Erosion?

Some signs and symptoms of tooth erosion include:
  • Discoloration
  • Tooth Sensitivity
  • Rounded Tooth
  • Transparent or a sand blasted appearance
  • Cracking
  • Dents

What Can I Do To Prevent Tooth Erosion?

To prevent tooth erosion, one should:
  • Rinse your mouth with water after eating or drinking acidic foods or beverages.
  • Try to have water and milk, instead of carbonated drinks.
  • Use a straw when you are having any sweet drink. Also try to swallow acidic liquids quickly instead of swishing them around or holding them in your mouth.
  • Chewing sugar-free gum can help reduce dry mouth and increase the saliva flow.
  • Use a soft toothbrush and toothpaste that contains fluoride.
Need to find a dentist? Let ToothTourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)

Contact
http://www.toothtourism.com/ today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

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Thursday, December 11, 2008

Dental Care Products

There are so many dental care products in the market, but how do we know which product to use? From toothpastes to toothbrushes to mouthwashes, get the facts you need to make informed decisions.

Toothbrushes
Ask your dentist and hygienist for recommending you new toothbrushes. Remember to change your toothbrush regularly after every 3 months.

Toothpastes/Gels
Daily brusing with toothpaste prevents you from developing dental decay and bad breath. Whitening Toothpaste helps maintain a white smile and fresh breath with daily brushing. Try to use Fluoride toothpaste, it prevents tooth and gum disease.

Interdental Products
An Interdental Brush is designed for removing plaque from between teeth along the gum line. Interdental brush comes in a variety of sizes (for different space sizes between teeth in various parts of the mouth) that allows you to choose the brush that best suits you.

Dental Floss Products
Dental Floss is used to remove food and plaque between the teeth and under your gum line. It may be flavored or unflavored and waxed or unwaxed.

Mouthwashes, Rinses and Sprays
A combined dental care system: tooth brushing, tongue cleaning, flossing with mouthwash can play a significant role in the treatments of bad breath. Some mouthwashes, rinses and sprays may contain fluoride, which helps to prevent or to reduce gum disease.

Tongue Cleaners
Tongue cleaners are suggested by dentists and hygienists. It helps to remove the build-up of bacteria and other compounds which result in bad breath so it is important to keep your tongue clean to avoid the risk of a problem developing.

Need to find a dentist? Let
ToothTourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)

Contact
http://www.toothtourism.com/ today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

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