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Saturday, March 22, 2008

What is Periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease is a serious chronic bacterial infection that directly affects your gums and the bone that supports your teeth. If it is left untreated it can lead to tooth loss. Untreated gingivitis is also one of the major reasons behind periodontal diseases.



Causes of Periodontal Disease


  • Smoking
  • Hormonal changes in girls/women. These sorts of changes make the gums more responsive and make it easier for gingivitis to develop.
  • Diabetes patients get affected easily by periodontal disease.
  • Stress. It is difficult for our body to fight against infection during the period of stress.
  • Medications. Antidepressants and heart medicines affect oral health as they diminish the flow of saliva.
  • Illnesses. Diseases like cancer or AIDS and their treatments can also affect the health of gums.
  • Genetic susceptibility. Some people are more prone to severe periodontal disease than others.


Types of Periodontal Disease


  • Gingivitis
  • Aggressive Periodontitis
  • Chronic Periodontitis
  • Periodontitis
  • Necrotizing


Symptoms


  • Bad breath that won't go away
  • Red or swollen gums
  • Tender or bleeding gums
  • Painful chewing
  • Loose teeth
  • Sensitive teeth


Treatment of Periodontal Disease


Your periodontist may recommend you to go for periodontal surgery. It is done at the time when the tissue around your teeth is unhealthy and cannot be repaired with non-surgical treatment. Following are the four types of surgical treatments most commonly prescribed:

  • Pocket Reduction Procedures
  • Regenerative Procedures
  • Crown Lengthening
  • Soft Tissue Grafts



How to Prevent Periodontal Disease


  • Brush your teeth twice a day
  • Floss every day
  • Visit the dentist routinely for a check-up and professional cleaning
  • Eat a well balanced diet
  • Do not use tobacco products


Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).

Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124 9am-5pm PST.

Thursday, March 20, 2008

What are your options for a whiter, brighter smile?

Teeth Whitening at the Dentist's Office


At the dentist's office this treatment could run up to $600, making this your most expensive option. Most dentists use a carbamide peroxide gel and provide customized dental trays molded by plaster casts of your teeth. These personalized trays reduce the risk of whitening lines. Most kits found at your local drugstore provide the same peroxide gel, but not the customized tray.

At Home Teeth Whitening Kits


With most home-whitening kits you get the same strength (or more powerful) of carbamide peroxide gel your dentist uses, but at a much cheaper price. Because you don't have to pay any dental fees you'll be saving hundreds of dollars. The only downside of teeth whitening at home is the quality of the dental tray, as it's usually a boil and bite mouthpiece. The comfort level is considerably less than their dentistry counterpart.

Whitening Strips


Plain and simple, whitening strips will have you spending money for little to no results. The products on the shelves are purposely made weaker by the manufacturing companies to keep the consumer coming back for more. Thus generating more profit for them and less satisfaction you.

Whitening Toothpastes


Whitening toothpastes are the same as whitening strips, they seem to have little or no effectiveness, and will end up costing you money.

Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).


Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124 9am-5pm PST.

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Dental Veneers

Dental veneers are wafer-thin, custom-made shells of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front surface of your teeth, much like a false fingernail fits over a nail.



Porcelain veneers, also called ceramic, are the preferred material that looks most "life-like" and are resistant to staining, but are also more expensive. Porcelain veneers are made in a dental laboratory and then bonded to the tooth.



Composite veneers are made of glass or quartz crystals in a resin base. They can be made in some dental offices and placed directly, or created in the mouth like bonding and contouring procedures. Composite venners are less expensive than porcelain but may be less stain resistant.



Advantages of Dental Veneers


  • They provide a natural tooth appearance.
  • Gum tissue tolerates porcelain well.
  • Porcelain veneers are stain resistant.
  • The color of a porcelain veneer can be selected such that it makes dark teeth appear whiter.
  • Veneers make teeth strong because they are apprehended in place by a special bonding solution.


Disadvantages of Dental Veneers


  • The process is not reversible.
  • Veneers are more costly than composite resin bonding.
  • Veneers are usually not repairable should they chip or crack.
  • Because enamel has been removed, your tooth may become more sensitive to hot and cold foods and beverages.
  • Teeth with veneers can still experience decay, possibly necessitating full coverage of the tooth with a crown.


What happens after the dental veneer is fitted?


Some tiny adjustments can be made to the veneer after it is fitted. It is usually best to wait a little while to get used to it before any changes are made. Your dentist will probably want to check and polish it a week or so after it is fitted and to make sure that you are happy with it.



How long do dental veneers last?


They should last for many years, but they can damage or break. Your dentist will advise you how long each individual veneer should last. Small chips can be repaired, or a new veneer fitted if necessary.



Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).


Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124.

Friday, March 14, 2008

Tooth Decay Prevention

A combination of bacteria and food causes tooth decay and cavities. It occurs when your teeth are frequently exposed to foods containing carbohydrates such as starches and sugars like soda pop, candy, cake and even sticky fruits. It damages your teeth and leads to filling or even removal. If not taken proper care, the tooth enamel may break down forming a hole or cavity into the dentin. Nerve damage can also result from severe decay. Dentists remove the decay and fill the tooth using a variety of fillings, restoring the tooth to a healthier state.



Causes of Tooth Decay


A number of micro-organisms, such as bacteria, are present in our mouth. Enzymes produced by these bacteria convert all foods - especially sugar and starch - into acids. Bacteria, acid, food debris, and saliva combine in the mouth to form a sticky substance called plaque that gets stuck in between the teeth, and if not removed, becomes a hard substance called tartar and irritates the gums. The acids in plaque can dissolve the enamel surface of the tooth and create holes in the tooth (cavities).


Cavities are usually painless until they grow very large inside the internal structures of the tooth and can cause death of the nerve and blood vessels in the tooth, leading to the formation of abscess. Untreated tooth decay can result in death of the internal structures of the tooth with eventual loss of the tooth.



Symptoms of Tooth Decay


Tooth pain, including sensitivity to cold food and drinks, bad breath, black or brown spots on teeth, and broken teeth can all be symptoms of tooth decay.



Preventing Tooth Decay


  • Prescription mouthwashes can help prevent decay.
  • Brush your teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste.
  • Clean between teeth daily with floss or an interdentally cleaner.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet and limit in-between meal snacks. Especially starchy or surgary foods.
  • Visit your dentist regularly for professional cleanings and oral exams.
  • Reduce frequent consumption of sugars.
  • Reduce the number of times each day that you eat fermentable carbohydrates or drink sugary drinks.


Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).



Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124.

Saturday, March 8, 2008

Dental Tourism Topic: Dental Implants

Dental implants are a solution for people who are missing teeth. A typical implant consists of a self-tapping titanium screw with a roughened surface, on top of which is placed a dental crown.

After the surgery, as the body heals, the bone around the implant fuses to the implant through a process called osseo-integration. After the healing phase is complete, the implants are used to anchor crowns, bridges, or dentures. Dental implants are the most natural replacement for a missing tooth.

How are dental implants performed?


The dentist will take x-rays of your mouth and take a thorough oral exam. Typically, the dentist will administer a local anesthetic to ease any discomfort during the operation. A pilot hole is then bored into the jawbone, to allow for the placement of the implant after the hole is drilled. The implant is then inserted into position.

After about 3-6 months, the dental implant(s) will be strong enough to support the load of new teeth. During the healing period, you will be provided with temporary "teeth" to allow you to carry on your way of life until the bone completely surrounds the implant. This may be an adhesive-type bridge or a denture.

Advantages of dental implants


  • Fresher, newer smile
  • Speech improvement
  • Greater comfort
  • Greater ability to chew food comfortably


Dental implants look and feel like natural teeth. Their stability eliminates problems associated with removable appliances, such as dentures and partials. These problems include:

  • Slipping, irritation and pain caused by dentures
  • Tedious removal for overnight soaking and cleaning
  • Inability to eat certain foods
  • Embarrassment eating or being seen without teeth


Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).

Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124.

Thursday, March 6, 2008

What is a Root Canal?

A root canal is also known as endodontic therapy or therapy within the tooth. It is one of the most common dental procedures performed. It is a very simple treatment that can save your natural teeth and prevent the need for dental implants.



At the center of your tooth is the pulp. The pulp is a collection of fine blood vessels, cells and a nerve. This system is originally used to help the tooth develop. Later it nourishes the tooth and helps provide information on temperature, pressure and pain. Damage to this very delicate system can be caused by infection, decay, cracks and chips, or repeated dental procedures and can be identified sometimes by pain, swelling, temperature or pressure sensitivity. Sometimes the only way to detect a problem is by x-ray where damage can be seen by the disappearance of canal space or bone loss.




What happens after the root canal?


After your root canal has been completed, curative treatment to the tooth will be suggested. Usually this involves a post and core to replace tooth structure lost from decay and the endodontic therapy. This is followed by a crown that will cover and protect the remaining tooth structure from fracture.



How much will it cost?


The cost may vary depending on factors such as; the severity of damage to the affected tooth and which tooth is affected. If you would like to save money on dental treatments visit ToothTourism.com. Compare root canal prices in Costa Rica, Panama, Mexico, or Dominican Republic.



Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).


Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. Call toll free: 1-800-644-9124.

Tuesday, March 4, 2008

Symptoms of Tooth Infection.

A tooth infection is a painful infection at the root of a tooth or between the gum and a tooth; most commonly caused by tooth decay. Everything inside the dead tooth cracks down and turns to liquid which is the mixture of living bacteria and rotten tissue and there is nothing left to fight bacterial growth. The dead tissue irritates the surrounding bone and the living bacteria try to invade the body.



An infection further results in tooth abscess, a collection of pus (dead tissue, live and dead bacteria, and white blood cells) and swelling of the tissues within the tooth. This causes a painful toothache and may also cause foul taste and foul smell. The infection always remains active even if the tooth had been pulled out and it gradually continues to spread and destroy other tissues also.



Treatment


The easiest way to get rid of the problem is a dental extraction. Antibiotics are prescribed to help fight the infection and to relieve the pain and discomfort related with an abscessed tooth, warm salt-water rinses.


Pain-reducing medication like ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin) can also be used. Root canal surgery may also be recommended to remove any diseased root tissue after the infection has collapsed. Additionally, a crown may be placed over the tooth.



Symptoms of Tooth Infection


  • Fever
  • Pain when chewing
  • Sensitivity of the teeth to hot or cold
  • Bitter taste in the mouth
  • Foul smell to the breath
  • Swollen neck glands
  • General discomfort, uneasiness, or ill feeling
  • Redness and swelling of the gums
  • Swollen area of the upper or lower jaw
  • An open, draining sore on the side of the gum


Prevention


Practice good dental hygiene:

  • Brush your teeth 2-3 times a day (after meals)
  • Floss
  • Use an antiseptic mouthwash
  • Go for regular dental checkups



Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!).


Contact www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. Call toll free: 1-800-644-9124.