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Tooth Tourism Blog

Friday, May 23, 2008

Gingivectomy for diseased gums

What is a gingivectomy?


A gingivectomy is commonly performed to remove diseased gum tissue, but this is just one type of procedure associated with this surgery. Sometimes a minor gingivectomy is performed to allow for more space in the placement of a crown or implant. Additionally, a gingivectomy can also be performed for cosmetic reasons.



How is a gingivectomy performed?


A local anesthetic is applied and one or more small incisions are made to allow part of the gum to be pulled back, like a flap. This allows the dentist to see the tooth and the bone as well as the surrounding gums. If gum tissue is removed, this is called gingival curettage. The dentist may also decide the tooth requires some type of dental work such as a filling.



The excess or diseased gum tissue is removed, the gum is sewn or sutured together, and a putty-type dressing is applied to cover the gum and prevent infection. Pain medication is usually given, and antibiotics can be prescribed if further infection is a concern. Healing can take a few weeks.



How to prevent gum disease


  • Brush your teeth properly twice a day. Brushing your teeth thoroughly removes plaque from the surface before it hardens into calculus.


  • Use a fluoride toothpaste. Using a toothpaste with fluoride helps to prevent decay.


  • Floss your teeth daily. Flossing is the only way to remove plaque from in between your teeth that a toothbrush can't reach.


  • Use a mouth rinse. An antimicrobial mouth rinse can provide extra help in controlling plaque.


  • Visit your dentist for regular check ups. Visiting your dentist on a regular basis is the best way to make sure that your teeth and gums stay healthy.


Need to find a dentist? Let ToothTourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)


Contact http://www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

Wednesday, May 21, 2008

What is a Dental Crown?

A crown is like a cup that covers the portion of a tooth which is at and above the gum line. Once it is glued on, the dental crown becomes the tooth's new outer surface. Dental crowns are sometimes called "dental caps" or "tooth caps."



Dental crowns are custom-fit to your teeth. The shape and size of the crown is based on molds of your teeth taken by the dentist. The molds are used by dental technicians, or the equivalent, to make your crowns.



Crowns are needed when a tooth is generally broken down and fillings can not suffice to alleviate the problem. The crown holds the tooth together to seal in the cracks and prevent the tooth from further cracking. It can be also used to support a large filling, attach a bridge, guard weak teeth from fracturing, restore fractured teeth, cover up badly shaped or discolored teeth, and protect a root-canal filled tooth.



Crowns can be prefabricated or made in a laboratory. Prefabricated crowns are made of plastic or stainless steel and can be used as a temporary restoration until a permanent crown is manufactured. In some cases, prefabricated crowns can be used as a permanent restoration.



Types of Dental Crowns


  • A telescopic crown builds up a tooth to be the height of its neighbours. Some dentists charge less for this type of crown.

  • A temporary crown is a plastic casing placed on an implant or in other cases where a permanent crown cannot yet be placed. A temporary crown provides aesthetics, helps prevent infection, and allows chewing.

  • An implant crown takes more work. When a crown is placed on top of an implant, the entire enamel "tooth" is created which takes more time and more materials. Some dentists charge more for this type of crown.


Crowns can be made from a variety of materials:

Porcelain crowns, also referred to as ceramic crowns, are the most "lifelike" type. However, a 100% porcelain crown may be chipped more easily, and may also be translucent or allow light through. Porcelain can be placed over metal for added support and less translucence. 100% porcelain sometimes costs more.



Metal crowns are usually made from a gold alloy or other metal alloy. Some metals are tolerated better by our bodies, and some are not. Metal crowns are not "lifelike" so are not as popular as they once were, but metal can add underlying support to a porcelain crown.



Composite crowns are usually made from an acrylic or a resin material. These are less expensive but not as lifelike. They may also stain more easily.



Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)



Contact http://www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

Tuesday, May 13, 2008

How to cure a toothache at home

A toothache is an aching pain in or around a tooth. Quite often, toothaches are caused by problems in the tooth or jaw, such as cavities, gum disease, growing wisdom teeth, a cracked tooth, infected dental pulp, jaw disease, or exposed tooth root.



Home Remedies for Toothache


  • Chewing cloves or rubbing clove oil on the infected tooth.
  • Mix a solution of salt, rinse your mouth as per your requirements.
  • Drink wheat grass juice, it is an excellent mouthwash for tooth decay and a natural toothache medicine.
  • Drops of vanilla extract on the affected tooth are an effective remedy.
  • Oil of oregano applied to the painful tooth is also effective.
  • Chewing raw onion or peppermint for a few minutes can also be helpful to eliminate toothache.
  • Ice is a one of the best toothache killers. When you have a toothache chew a piece of ice on the aching side of the mouth, although in the case of cavity this may make it hurt more!


Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)


Contact http://www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

Tuesday, May 6, 2008

What is Xerostomia?

Xerostomia, commonly known as "dry mouth", is the irregular decrease of saliva due to medication and/or disease. Dry mouth due to lack of saliva can be a serious medical problem. Decreased salivation can make swallowing difficult, decrease taste sensation, and promote tooth decay.



Causes and Symptoms


Dry mouth can be caused by:

  • Medications, both prescription and non prescription medicine
  • HIV infection
  • Diabetes
  • Chronic and progressive inflammation of skeletal muscles
  • Infections of the salivary glands
  • Blockage of the salivary ducts



Treatment of Xerostomia


If dry mouth is caused by medicine, the medicine should be changed. If dry mouth is caused by blockage of the salivary ducts, the cause of the blockage should be investigated.


When systemic diseases, such as diabetes and anemia, are brought under control dry mouth problems may decrease. Dry mouth caused by the aging process or radiation therapy for cancer can be treated by such oral medications as pilocarpine (Salagen).



Drugs that are given to increase the flow of saliva are known as sialogogues.



Things you can do at home for treating dry mouth:

  • Wash mouth with water frequently
  • Use saliva substitute
  • Apply lip moisturizer often
  • Avoid mouthwashes with an alcohol base
  • Avoid lemon glycerin swabs as they may contribute to dryness
  • Drink plenty of liquids, at least 8-12 glasses of fluid a day
  • Limit coffee and tea intake
  • Eat a soft, high-protein, moist diet
  • Avoid acidic foods and juices
  • Avoid sodas that are fizzy



Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)



Contact http://www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.

Saturday, May 3, 2008

Teeth Brushing 101

Brushing is the key to maintaining and creating a healthy-looking, beautiful smile. Here are some tips to help you improve your brushing procedure.



Brush Two Times A Day

Remember to brush with a soft bristle toothbrush and fluoride toothpaste twice a day. Spend at least 2-5 minutes brushing your teeth. Replace toothbrush at least four times a year.



Brush Teeth Properly

The best way to brush your teeth is by holding the toothbrush at a 45-degree angle against the gum line, while moving the brush back and forth with short gentle strokes in the outer and inner surfaces of the teeth.



Don't Forget Your Tongue

Remember to clean your tongue with your toothbrush, it helps to remove bacteria and to prevent bad breath.



Remember To Floss

Flossing helps to remove plaque and food particles that get stuck between your teeth. It also prevents bad breath, cavities, and oral diseases like gingivitis.

Use Mouthwash

Mouthwash is a great way to end your brushing regimen and start your day with fresh, clean breath. Stay away from mouthwashes that temporarily mask bad breath.



Maintain A Healthy Diet

A diet that is low in sugar keeps teeth strong and gums healthy. Getting the necessary supply of calcium is also important for strong teeth.



Visit Your Dentist

Make sure you visit your dentist twice a year to prevent any dental problems.



Need to find a dentist? Let Tooth Tourism.com do the work for you. Our Canadian medical professionals have traveled the globe to meet English speaking board-certified dentists who welcome the dental tourist (that's you!)


Contact http://www.toothtourism.com today for more information on how you can find affordable dental treatments abroad. To speak with a Tooth Tourism representative call (toll free): 1-800-644-9124, Mon - Fri, 9am-5pm PST.